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Emmy® Nominated Filmmakers to Preview New Documentary “Lost Nation: The Ioway 2&3” at
the Iowa Tribe of Kansas and Nebraska

Event Sponsored by the Kansas Humanities Council

Kelly and Tammy Rundle of Fourth Wall Films, producers of the Emmy® nominated documentary Country School: One Room-One Nation and the award-winning Lost Nation: The Ioway will appear for a special Kansas Humanities Council preview screening of their new documentary Lost Nation: The Ioway 2&3 at the Iowa Tribe of Kansas and Nebraska, Casino White Cloud Bingo Hall, 777 Jackpot Drive, White Cloud, Kansas on Monday, December 17, 2012 at 6:00 p.m.   Following the film presentation, the Rundles will join other film participants for Q&A.  The event is free to the public.

When the Ioway are forcibly removed from their ancestral homelands in 1837 to a reservation in Northeast Kansas, Ioway leader White Cloud (The Younger) believes his people must relocate to survive. But intermarriage, broken treaties and the end of communal living leads to a split in 1878 and the establishment of a second Ioway tribe in Oklahoma. Both tribes endure hardship and challenges to their traditions and culture to achieve successful land claims and self-determination in the1970s. Lost Nation: The Iowa 2&3 brings the Ioway story full circle.

The Ioway join other American Indians, historians, anthropologists and archaeologists to tell the dramatic and true story of the small tribe that once claimed the territory between the Missouri and Mississippi Rivers from Pipestone, Minnesota to St. Louis.

Through their fiscal sponsor Kansas Public Telecommunications Service, Inc. (KPTS-PBS), the documentary sequel project was awarded a grant from Kansas Humanities Council and the National Endowment for the Humanities for production in Kansas.

Lost Nation: The Ioway 2&3 will premiere in February 2013, with public television broadcasts and a DVD release to follow. An alternative soundtrack in the nearly extinct Ioway language will be offered on the DVD.  The special KHC preview screening of Lost Nation: The Ioway 2&3 offers the public a sneak-peek at the new films.

For more information about the KHC preview screening of Lost Nation: The Ioway 2&3, visit www.IowayMovie.com.

The Kansas Humanities Council is a nonprofit organization that supports communitybased cultural programs, serves as a financial resource through an active grant-making program, and encourages Kansans to engage in the civic and cultural life of their communities. For more information, visit www.kansashumanities.org.  Funding for this program is provided in part by a grant from the Kansas Humanities Council (KHC) and the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH).  Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in these films and program do not necessarily represent those of KHC or NEH.

 

 

Miami Oklahoma Public Library to Preview
Emmy
® Nominated Filmmakers’ New Documentary
“Lost Nation: The Ioway 2&3”   

Event Sponsored by Oklahoma Humanities Council

Emmy® nominated filmmakers Kelly and Tammy Rundle, of Fourth Wall Films, will appear for a special Oklahoma Humanities Council preview screening of their new documentary Lost Nation: The Ioway 2&3 at the Miami Oklahoma Public Library, 200 Main Street, Miami, Oklahoma on Wednesday, December 19, 2012 at 6:30 p.m.  Following the film presentation, the Rundles will join Tribal Elder Joyce BigSoldier-Miller from the Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma for Q&A.  The event is free to the public.

When the Ioway are forcibly removed from their ancestral homelands in 1837 to a reservation in Northeast Kansas, Ioway leader White Cloud (The Younger) believes his people must relocate to survive. But intermarriage, broken treaties and the end of communal living leads to a split in 1878 and the establishment of a second Ioway tribe in Oklahoma. Both tribes endure hardship and challenges to their traditions and culture to achieve successful land claims and self-determination in the1970s. Lost Nation: The Iowa 2&3 brings the Ioway story full circle.

The Ioway join other American Indians, historians, anthropologists and archaeologists to tell the dramatic and true story of the small tribe that once claimed the territory between the Missouri and Mississippi Rivers from Pipestone, Minnesota to St. Louis.

Through their fiscal sponsor Kansas Public Telecommunications Service, Inc. (KPTS-PBS), the documentary sequel project was awarded a grant from Oklahoma Humanities Council and the National Endowment for the Humanities for production in Oklahoma.

Lost Nation: The Ioway 2&3 will premiere in February 2013, with public television broadcasts and a DVD release to follow. An alternative soundtrack in the nearly extinct Ioway language will be offered on the DVD.  The special OHC preview screening of Lost Nation: The Ioway 2&3 offers the public a sneak-peek at the new film.

The Oklahoma Humanities Council is an independent, nonprofit organization whose mission is to provide meaningful public engagement with the humanities—disciplines such as history, literature, film studies, art criticism and philosophy.   As the state partner for the National Endowment for the Humanities, OHC provides teacher institutes, Smithsonian exhibits, reading groups and other cultural opportunities for Oklahomans of all ages.  With a focus on K-12 education and community building, OHC engages people in their own communities, stimulating discussion and helping them explore the wider world of human experience. 

Funding for this program is provided in part by a grant from the Oklahoma Humanities Council (OHC) and the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH).  Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in these films and program do not necessarily represent those of OHC or NEH.

  

Iowa Governor Culver Honors Iowa Tribe of Kansas and Nebraska, and Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma--Proclaims Oct. 3-9, 2010 "Native Ioway History Week"

IPTV-PBS' Broadcast Premiere of "Lost Nation: The Ioway" and More PBS Broadcasts Continue in November

Iowa Governor Chet Culver has proclaimed October 3-9, 2010 the fourth annual Native Ioway History Week (full text attached below), honoring the Iowa Tribe of Kansas and Nebraska, and the Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma. The IPTV-PBS broadcast premiere of “Lost Nation: The Ioway”, the award-winning documentary by Kelly and Tammy Rundle of Fourth Wall Films, will launch the historic tribute.

“The special week reminds state residents and Iowa educators to remember the American Indian people whose name the state bears,” said “Ioway” producer Kelly Rundle.

The film takes viewers on an unforgettable and vivid journey into America's Native past and present. In 1824, during the twilight of Native American dominion, two conflicted Ioway leaders met with William Clark to sign a momentous treaty. White Cloud (Mahaska) saw cooperation as survival for his people, while Great Walker (Moanahonga) regretted the loss of their ancestral homeland. This pivotal moment led both men to different tragic destinies in their battle with epic change. Ioway Elders join historians and archaeologists to tell the dramatic and true story of the small tribe that once claimed the territory between the Missouri and Mississippi Rivers from Pipestone, Minnesota to St. Louis. What was a quest for survival in the past, has become a struggle to retain a unique Native American culture and language in the present.

The documentary has drawn national attention to the tribes’ little-known history and a sequel project, currently in production, will be released in 2012. The two additional one-hour films will complete the Ioways’ epic story.

In addition to the broadcast premiere on IPTV October 3rd, at 6:00 p.m., “Lost Nation: The Ioway” will show again on IPTV on October 4th and 26th at 8pm and November 1 at 9:30pm. It will broadcast on: NET-PBS in Nebraska on November 4 at 10pm; WQPT-PBS in Illinois on November 16 at 7pm; KCPT-PBS in Kansas City, Missouri/Kansas on November 18 at 8pm; OET-PBS in Oklahoma on Tuesday, November 23 at 9pm. Broadcasts on KMOS-PBS in Missouri and KPTS-PBS in Kansas, as well as PBS stations in Minnesota and Wisconsin to be announced.

“Ioway” was funded in part by Humanities Iowa, the Kansas Humanities Council, the Nebraska Humanities Council, the Oklahoma Humanities Council, and the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) and Smokestacks National Heritage Area.

Fourth Wall Films is a film and video production company based in Moline, Illinois. The Rundles, who focus primarily on Iowa and Midwestern history subjects, previously produced the critically-acclaimed “Villisca: Living with a Mystery” and will release their documentary “Country School: One Room – One Nation” in November 2010. They are currently co-producing the documentary “Movie Star: The Secret Lives of Jean Seberg” with Emmy-nominated filmmaker Garry McGee.

Rundles' Host Centennial Screening of "Lost Nation: The Ioway" at Black Hawk State Historic Site

Two years after its premiere, the award-winning film Lost Nation: The Ioway will mark its 100th public showing with a special free screening event at Black Hawk State Historic Site in Rock Island on February 20th, 2010 at 7pm.  Documentary filmmakers Kelly and Tammy Rundle will host a discussion and Q&A following the presentation.

Ioway, which explores the nearly forgotten story of the Ioway Tribe, has won several top awards at film festivals, and is an Official Selection at the Archaeology Channel’s International Film Festival in Eugene, Oregon in May.  The film was released nationally on DVD in the fall of 2008, and will have its broadcast debut on Midwestern PBS stations this fall.

 “When we started out in 2005, literally walking the paths of the Ioway, I don’t think that either one of us, or the Ioway people expected that the film would come this far,” said producer Tammy Rundle.

“Ioway’s success has mostly been by word of mouth,” said director Kelly Rundle. “I grew up visiting Black Hawk State Historic Site and it is the perfect place to celebrate the 100th showing of the documentary.”

The special centennial showing of Lost Nation: The Ioway will take place on Saturday, February 20th, 7:00pm at Black Hawk State Historic Site’s Watch Tower Lodge, 1510 46th Avenue, Rock Island.  A Q&A discussion with the Rundles and a special guest will follow the 1-hour documentary.  The program will also feature a display of artifacts and items related to Ioway history and culture, and the making of the film.  Admission is free.  For more information please call (309) 788-9536.

Ioway was funded in part by Humanities Iowa, the Nebraska Humanities Council, the Kansas Humanities Council, the Oklahoma Humanities Council, Silos and Smokestacks National Heritage Area and the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH).

"Lost Nation: The Ioway" Documentary Film Event Brings Southern California and Midwestern Native American Nations Together for the First Time

History will be made in downtown Los Angeles when the award-winning documentary Lost Nation: The Ioway makes its West Coast debut and brings together for the first time members of the Ioway Nations of the Midwest and the Los Angeles’ Gabrielino/Tongva Nation.  The special free event begins at 7pm on February 25, 2010 at the “Bringing the Circle Together” Native American Film Series located at the National Center for the Preservation of Democracy.

A vivid journey into America’s Native past and present, Lost Nation: The Ioway tells the nearly forgotten story of the small Ioway Tribe that once claimed the territory between the Missouri and Mississippi Rivers, from Pipestone, Minnesota to St. Louis.  What was a quest for survival in the past became a struggle to retain a unique Native American culture and language in the present.

Filmmakers Kelly and Tammy Rundle of Fourth Wall Films were invited to present Ioway at “Bringing the Circle Together” by organizer Lorin Morgan-Richards who believed the story of the Ioway was similar to that of the original inhabitants of the Los Angeles basin, the Tongva Nation.

The special screening and ceremonial event will honor the Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma, The Iowa Tribe of Kansas and Nebraska, and the Gabrielino/Tongva Nation.  In a momentous ceremony, the Ioway Tribes will be welcomed by the Tongva people and open with a prayer.  The Ioway will honor the Tongva with a sacred Eagle Dance.

"When we started out in 2005, literally walking the paths of the Ioway, I don't think that either one of us, or the Ioway people expected that the film would come this far," said producer Tammy Rundle.

"Ioway's success has mostly been by word of mouth," said director Kelly Rundle.  "To have the film invited to screen in Los Angeles and the Ioway recognized and honored, tops off an incredible journey."

The documentary has won several top awards at film festivals and is an Official Selection at the Archaeology Channel's International Film Festival in Eugene, Oregon in May.  The film was released nationally on DVD in 2008, and will be broadcast on Midwestern PBS stations in the fall.

This historic screening event will take place on Thursday, February 25th, 7:00pm at the National Center for the Preservation of Democracy, 111 North Central Avenue in downtown Los Angeles.  A Q&A discusssion with the Rundles, Southern Ioway Tribal Elder Joyce BigSoldier and Northern Ioway Tribal Member Sarita McGowan will follow the 1-hour documentary.  In addition to the special ceremonial presentations that evening, the program will also feature a display of items related to Ioway history and culture, and the making of the film.  Admission is free to the public.

The program is sponsored by the Department of Cultural Affairs, The Japanese American National Museum, The American Indian Community Council, SCIC-InterTribal Entertainment, Hech de Mano, and Nahui Ohlin.

Lost Nation: The Ioway was funded in part by Humanities Iowa, the Nebraska Humanities Council, the Kansas Humanities Council, the Oklahoma Humanities Council, Silos and Smokestacks National Heritage Area and the National Endowment for the Humanities.

"Bringing the Circle Together," a free monthly Native American Film Series, was established to provide quality documentaries by and about Indigenous cultures of the Americas, and bring together a central gathering place where discussion and awareness of issues can be shared with the Native community and its supporters.

Rundles' Host Centennial Screening of "Lost Nation: The Ioway" at Black Hawk State Historic Site

Two years after its premiere, the award-winning film Lost Nation: The Ioway will mark its 100th public showing with a special free screening event at Black Hawk State Historic Site in Rock Island on February 20th, 2010 at 7pm.  Documentary filmmakers Kelly and Tammy Rundle will host a discussion and Q&A following the presentation.

Ioway, which explores the nearly forgotten story of the Ioway Tribe, has won several top awards at film festivals, and is an Official Selection at the Archaeology Channel’s International Film Festival in Eugene, Oregon in May.  The film was released nationally on DVD in the fall of 2008, and will have its broadcast debut on Midwestern PBS stations this fall.

 “When we started out in 2005, literally walking the paths of the Ioway, I don’t think that either one of us, or the Ioway people expected that the film would come this far,” said producer Tammy Rundle.

“Ioway’s success has mostly been by word of mouth,” said director Kelly Rundle. “I grew up visiting Black Hawk State Historic Site and it is the perfect place to celebrate the 100th showing of the documentary.”

The special centennial showing of Lost Nation: The Ioway will take place on Saturday, February 20th, 7:00pm at Black Hawk State Historic Site’s Watch Tower Lodge, 1510 46th Avenue, Rock Island.  A Q&A discussion with the Rundles and a special guest will follow the 1-hour documentary.  The program will also feature a display of artifacts and items related to Ioway history and culture, and the making of the film.  Admission is free.  For more information please call (309) 788-9536.

Ioway was funded in part by Humanities Iowa, the Nebraska Humanities Council, the Kansas Humanities Council, the Oklahoma Humanities Council, Silos and Smokestacks National Heritage Area and the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH).

Demand for "Lost Nation: The Ioway" Continues  in 2009

The award-winning Lost Nation: The Ioway continues to screen in cities and towns throughout the Midwest in 2009.  On Tuesday, May 12th, the film will make have its 80th showing in the city of Oskaloosa, Iowa as part of a special celebration commemorating the 100th anniversary of Sherry Edmundson Fry's sculpture of Ioway Chief Mahaska (White Cloud) which stands in the city square.

The program begins at 5:15pm with a special address by Mayor David Dixon, local historian Chuck Russell and film producers Kelly and Tammy Rundle at the Mahaska monument site in Oskaloosa's city square.

From 5:30pm-6:30pm a special reception and "Lost Nation: The Ioway" DVD signing will be hosted at the Book Vault (directly across the street from the Mahaska statue), 105 South Market St, Oskaloosa, IA 52577, (641) 676-1777.

From 7:30pm-9:00pm A free screening of the award-winning documentary "Lost Nation: The Ioway" will take place at William Penn University, The Chief Mahaska Assembly Room, 201 Trueblood Avenue, Oskaloosa, IA. Following the film, producers Kelly and Tammy Rundle, and several film participants will participate in Q&A.

This special free event commemorates the 100th anniversary of Sherry Edmundson Fry's sculpture of Ioway Chief Mahaska (White Cloud). The stylized life-size cast bronze sculpture depicts Mahaska of the Ioway tribe standing on an eight-foot gray granite pedestal. Fry created the sculpture in 1908 while in Paris, France where it was awarded the 'Prix de Rome'. The Mahaska statue was unveiled and dedicated on May 12, 1909 in the Oskaloosa City Square Park.

Ioway Chief Mahaska became a symbol of the virtues of his native life and of the possibility of peace between Native Americans and settlers. Later generations saw him as a nostalgic symbol of the vanishing frontier.

"Lost Nation: The Ioway" DVD to be released nationally on 171st anniversary of the No Heart Map

The DVD version of Lost Nation: The Ioway is slated for release on October 7, 2008.  The DVD will feature the 57-minute film, and up to 2 hours of additional material.  The most unique feature will be an alternative soundtrack in the Ioway language (Baxoje).  The translation work was done by Baxoje linguist Jimm Goodtracks.

An educational version with study guide and public performance license will also be available for schools and libraries.

Preorders of the DVD can be made online by CLICKING HERE.  Payment can also be made by check by emailing us at: IowayFilm@aol.com.

Preordered-DVDs will be shipped in September 2008, prior to the October 7 release date.

2008 Landlocked Film Festival makes "Lost Nation: The Ioway" an Official Selection

Lost Nation: The Ioway is an 'Official Selection' at this year's Landlocked Film Festival.

The festival showcases independent films from around the world in the categories of documentary features and shorts, feature films, short narrative films, and animation.

The festival is held in Iowa City August 21-24th, 2008.  Visit www.LandlockedFilmFestival.org for information on venues, dates, times and admission prices.

"Lost Nation: The Ioway" featured at Ragbrai event in North Liberty

Lost Nation: The Ioway will be shown during North Liberty's Ragbrai Entertainment Program on Thursday, July 24th, 2008 at the Community Center in the Gerdin Conference Room. 

The program begins at 4pm and features the one-hour film, Q&A with filmmakers Kelly and Tammy Rundle, followed by a tour of Woodpecker Cave led by Archaeologist Lynn Alex from the Office of the State Archaeologist.

Admission is FREE!  North Liberty Community Center is located at 530 W. Cherry Street, North Liberty, Iowa.

"Ioway" Receives Bronze Telly Award

Lost Nation: The Ioway has been awarded a Bronze Telly Award for 'Outstanding Achievement in a Television Documentary."

The bronze statuette is made by the same company that manufactures the Emmys and the Oscars.

"Lost Nation: The Ioway" wins 'Best Doc' at Iowa Independent Film Fest

Lost Nation: The Ioway was awarded the top prize for "Best Documentary 2008" at the Iowa Independent Film Festival at Music Man Square in Mason City, Iowa, April 25-27, 2008.

The documentary category featured many excellent documentaries, including "King Corn", "The Real Dirt on Farmer John", "Phyllis and Harold", and showcased the excellent documentary "The Last Wright" by Gary McGee and Lucille Carra.

"We were honored that "Ioway" was among so many exceptional films," said Producer Tammy Rundle.

Lost Nation: The Ioway Wins 2 Top Awards at Cedar Rapids Independent Film Festival

"Lost Nation: The Ioway won the top professional documentary award at the Cedar Rapids Independent Film Festival, held April 4-5, 2008 at the Collins Road Theatres. 

"Ioway" also received a special award as the film that "...best represents Iowa and filmmaking in Iowa...".

Beloit International Film Festival Selects "Lost Nation: The Ioway"

"Lost Nation: The Ioway" was selected by invitation at the Beloit International Film Festival, held January 17-18, 2008. 

"Ioway" placed second among 40 documentary films in competion. 

Anthropologist William Green, who appears in "Ioway" and provided historical consulation, joined the Rundles for Q&A following each showing of the film.

10.11.2007: "Lost Nation: The Ioway" premieres before the public and nearly 200 Ioway people in Des Moines at the State Historical Society

05.01.2006: IowayMovie.com goes online

04.24.2006: Fourth Wall Films receives Grant from the Oklahoma Humanities Council for "Lost Nation: The Ioway"

04.10.2006: "Lost Nation: The Ioway" filmmakers win top documentary award with "Villisca: Living with a Mystery"

08.01.2005: First phase of production on "Lost Nation: The Ioway" complete

07.07.2005: "Lost Nation: The Ioway" historical documentary announcement

05.01.2005: Fourth Wall Films receives a grant from Humanities Iowa for "Lost Nation: The Ioway"

CLICK HERE to Preview "Lost Nation: The Ioway"

CLICK HERE to buy the DVD

CLICK HERE to buy the Poster

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